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Volume 48, issue 6
Arch. Anim. Breed., 48, 580–591, 2005
https://doi.org/10.5194/aab-48-580-2005
© Author(s) 2005. This work is distributed under
the Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 License.
Arch. Anim. Breed., 48, 580–591, 2005
https://doi.org/10.5194/aab-48-580-2005
© Author(s) 2005. This work is distributed under
the Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 License.

  10 Oct 2005

10 Oct 2005

Estimation of body composition of pigs by a near-infrared interactance probe technique

A. D. Mitchell1, A. M. Scholz2, and M. B. Solomon3 A. D. Mitchell et al.
  • 1United States Department of Agriculture Growth Biology Laboratory Beltsville, MD 20705, USA
  • 2Lehr- und Versuchsgut der Tierärztlichen Fakultät der Ludwig-Maximilians-Universität München, Hubertusstr. 12, 85764 Oberschleißheim, Germany
  • 3United States Department of Agriculture Food Technology and Safety Laboratory Beltsville, MD 20705, USA

Abstract. Near-infrared (NIR) interactance was evaluated as a potentially new method for estimating live body and carcass composition of pigs. Using a surface placed fiber optic probe, measurements of the live animal and carcass were made on a total of 120 pigs. These measurements were compared with lipid and protein content of soft tissue dissected from the pig carcass. NIR results were evaluated using multiple regression equations containing NIR readings at various locations on the body, combinations of wavelengths and with or without ultrasonic fat depth readings and body weight. NIR measurements made on the carcass predicted percent carcass fat (R = 0.71) better than did measurements made on the live animal (R = 0.66), however, both could be improved substantially by including live body weight in the prediction equation (R = 0.93 and 0.91). Spectral information indicated that the depth of tissue penetration and reflectance may be the primary limitation in this application of the current technology.

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