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Volume 46, issue 3
Arch. Anim. Breed., 46, 245–256, 2003
https://doi.org/10.5194/aab-46-245-2003
© Author(s) 2003. This work is distributed under
the Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 License.
Arch. Anim. Breed., 46, 245–256, 2003
https://doi.org/10.5194/aab-46-245-2003
© Author(s) 2003. This work is distributed under
the Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 License.

  10 Oct 2003

10 Oct 2003

Mangalica – an indigenous swine breed from Hungary (Review)

I. Egerszegi1, J. Rátky1, L. Solti2, and K.-P. Brüssow3 I. Egerszegi et al.
  • 1Research Institute for Animal Breeding and Nutrition, 2053 Herceghalom, Hungary
  • 2Faculty of Veterinary Science, Szent Istvan University, 1400 Budapest, Hungary
  • 3Research Institute for the Biology of Farm Animals, Wilhelm-Stahl-Allee 2, 18196 Dummerstorf, Germany

Abstract. Nowadays there is an increased demand to preserve the biological diversity in wild and farm animals. In this paper the history, utilisation and reproductive performance of the endangered native Hungarian swine breed Mangalica are reviewed. This fat-type race was the most typical since the middle of the nineteenth century. However, Mangalica nearly disappeared in the 1970-ies due to changing dietary habits and breeding of modern industrial pig breeds. The valuable characteristics of Mangalica, like resistance and excellent adaptability to extreme housing conditions, motherliness and delicious meat taste are recognised anew.

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